Why choose a literature based curriculum

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I just wanted to share this little article that I wrote for our curriculum MBTP, that was published yesterday. I am so excited and thrilled that they decided to share it on their website !

I really love our curriculum and am so thankful we found it. I know each curriculum doesn’t work out for everyone, but this was our match and I am glad we found it early in our homeschool life. I don’t know if we will always stick with it, but for now we are loving it and it’s working out pretty well.
Anyways, if you have questions about it or need more info, I would love to help !

Also the SPRING FLING, the best SALE of the year should be coming up soon, so sign up now, then you won’t miss it !!

Here is the link to the article, if the link doesn’t take you directly to it, check under the blog section !

 

http://www.movingbeyondthepage.com/articles/why-choose-a-literature-based-curriculum/

Or you can just read the copy from the website right here 😉

When my family first began homeschooling, I was introduced to dozens of previously unknown curriculum strategies. There was classical education, core curriculum, common core curriculum, Waldorf, Montessori, and unschooling. I even learned how to align curriculum based on learning style. In just a few days I felt overwhelmed by the possibilities. The curriculum choices seemed endless.

As I began searching for the right curriculum for my family, I came upon the termliterature-based. Literature-based curriculum utilizes real literature and books for students’ studies instead of textbooks. My children love books, so when I first heard about literature-based curriculum, I was intrigued. I definitely wanted my curriculum to include lots of fun books. I also knew that I wanted things to be “hands-on,” and the combination of the two of these led us to Moving Beyond the Page.

Things I Like about Literature-Based Curriculum

Through a literature-based curriculum, my children are exposed to a broad variety of literature. Most literature-based curricula will include a large number of the “classics” as well as modern novels, poetry, and biographies. Children will get introduced to some masterpieces by marvelous, timeless authors, authentic documents from history, and thought-provoking poetry. They will also begin to learn through connecting multiple subjects and themes. These books will often connect to language arts, history, social studies, science, or other subjects. Your child will be engaged and learn multiple subjects just by reading one book.

Stories make our brains come alive. They make learning easier and more fun. Our brains build more connections when those connections are intertwined with story. When I first considered Moving Beyond the Page, I mainly looked at the list of books that we would go through for each level, and we all got really excited about the selections. I like to include my kids with the decisions about choosing a curriculum whenever I can. It gets them excited, and being excited and curious are important parts of learning.

What I love most about a literature-based curriculum is all the possibilities it gives us. We have so many wonderful opportunities to discuss a variety of subjects that come up in every book. We often discuss moral values and character traits, and I can tell how much it helps my children in learning the process of reading, thinking, writing, and connecting it all. The possibilities and activities are endless. We will do an author study here or there or “travel” to different countries where different authors lived and possibly even learn about their time period’s history.

A final benefit I can see with a literature-based curriculum is that it is easier to include different age groups of children together. Having multiple kids and trying to have them all work on different curricula can be a daunting task. Even though I opted against grouping my own two children together, I know plenty of families that make this work well because they can change up individual activities for each child while the family reads the same base material together. Even kids that might not be able to actually read yet will be able to listen and answer comprehension questions and with that get a feeling of being included. Activities in general leave a lot of open space for creative work. While reading stories, the kids get inspired in many ways — they can draw pictures, act things out, or even work together on bigger projects in groups. Students can pick and choose to work in ways that they enjoy most.

In our one year with Moving Beyond the Page, we have gotten to experience all of these things I have mentioned. We have gotten to know many wonderful, inspiring novels and met some amazing authors. We have made several great crafts and cooked incredible recipes from forgotten nations or from old historic times. We have written plays and acted them out and drawn many wonderful pictures. I am thankful that I get this precious time with my children and get to discover some of these amazing books with them together. It is a time that I will forever cherish and remember. We have made a connection through the books while talking about them. Laughing about the funny quotes from The BFG, learning about Ben Franklin through a little mouse, and cooking pioneer meals with Laura Ingalls Wilder have made this homeschool year unforgettable!

Julia Goss is a homeschooling mom of two kids. She has used the Age 5-7 and Age 8-10 levels of Moving Beyond the Page. Your can follow her blog athttps://beyondthebookshomeschool.wordpress.com/.

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